The Cloud of Boeing’s Dreamliner Delay Has a Silver Lining

“We have taken advantage of the delays to make sure our system-level maturity is coming along at a rate that will avoid problems as we enter flight test,” Boeing Commercial Airplanes chief Scott Carson said at an aerospace and defense conference in New York on February 6th.
Boeing is planning to start test flights on its 787 Dreamliner in late June, months later than first projected. Mr. Carson admitted that Boeing has learned lessons during the 787 Dreamliner’s development, and said that the company is trying to improve relationships with its suppliers–on which this project is depending more than other Boeing planes, and who have an enormous impact on timing. In the field of creative and innovative endeavors, deadlines are difficult to set, and the ground-breaking Dreamliner is no exception. More time, consequently, is being devoted to the Dreamliner’s advanced electronical systems and perfecting them. “We’re finding that the system is straightening itself out in a hurry,” Carson said. “It has required a great deal of effort on our part and on our supply partners, but we are on track at this point.”

~~M-J de M.

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Airplane Size: the Sky’s the Limit for Some

Megalomania looms large in the field of super-jumbo jets. Sir Richard Branson’s own Virgin Airways already has eight A380s on order from Airbus, but is planning to order the A380-900 which are said to become available in 2015. These colossal cities in the sky will seat 900 people. “Ideally, we’d like Airbus to stretch them, because for the A380 to be really competitive it needs to be even bigger than it currently is,” said Sir Richard of Virgin Airways. This sort of reasoning flies in the face of the zeitgeist, which involves planes being more efficient and having as small an environmental impact as possible while seating hundreds, as the Boeing Dreamliner exemplifies. An important factor to consider is the availability of landing space at airports–the choices of landing fields would be limited in the case of the Airbus A380-900. Another concern ought to be the great number of human lives at risk in the sky and on the ground.

Of course, it’s a little different from public transportation when you are just desirous of a palace in the sky, as is Prince Walid bin Talal of Saudi Arabia.

Airbus announced lately that the Saudi billionaire had become the first V.I.P. customer for the A380 superjumbo jet, one of which costs just over $300 million.

Prince Walid bin Talal signed the contract for a new flying palace at a ceremony with senior Airbus executives at the Dubai air show. He expects to take delivery in 2010. Perhaps the plane will have a limited number of routes and therefore fewer needs for king-sized landing-strips.

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Airplane Size: the Sky’s the Limit for Some

Megalomania looms large in the field of super-jumbo jets. Sir Richard Branson’s own Virgin Airways already has eight A380s on order from Airbus, but is planning to order the A380-900 which are said to become available in 2015. These colossal cities in the sky will seat 900 people. “Ideally, we’d like Airbus to stretch them, because for the A380 to be really competitive it needs to be even bigger than it currently is,” said Sir Richard of Virgin Airways. This sort of reasoning flies in the face of the zeitgeist, which involves planes being more efficient and having as small an environmental impact as possible while seating hundreds, as the Boeing Dreamliner exemplifies. An important factor to consider is the availability of landing space at airports–the choices of landing fields would be limited in the case of the Airbus A380-900. Another concern ought to be the great number of human lives at risk in the sky and on the ground.

Of course, it’s a little different from public transportation when you are just desirous of a palace in the sky, as is Prince Walid bin Talal of Saudi Arabia.

Airbus announced lately that the Saudi billionaire had become the first V.I.P. customer for the A380 superjumbo jet, one of which costs just over $300 million.

Prince Walid bin Talal signed the contract for a new flying palace at a ceremony with senior Airbus executives at the Dubai air show. He expects to take delivery in 2010. Perhaps the plane will have a limited number of routes and therefore fewer needs for king-sized landing-strips.

Click Here to View Newest Entries

Airplane Size: the Sky’s the Limit for Some

Megalomania looms large in the field of super-jumbo jets. Sir Richard Branson’s own Virgin Airways already has eight A380s on order from Airbus, but is planning to order the A380-900 which are said to become available in 2015. These colossal cities in the sky will seat 900 people. “Ideally, we’d like Airbus to stretch them, because for the A380 to be really competitive it needs to be even bigger than it currently is,” said Sir Richard of Virgin Airways. This sort of reasoning flies in the face of the zeitgeist, which involves planes being more efficient and having as small an environmental impact as possible while seating hundreds, as the Boeing Dreamliner exemplifies. An important factor to consider is the availability of landing space at airports–the choices of landing fields would be limited in the case of the Airbus A380-900. Another concern ought to be the great number of human lives at risk in the sky and on the ground.

Of course, it’s a little different from public transportation when you are just desirous of a palace in the sky, as is Prince Walid bin Talal of Saudi Arabia.

Airbus announced lately that the Saudi billionaire had become the first V.I.P. customer for the A380 superjumbo jet, one of which costs just over $300 million.

Prince Walid bin Talal signed the contract for a new flying palace at a ceremony with senior Airbus executives at the Dubai air show. He expects to take delivery in 2010. Perhaps the plane will have a limited number of routes and therefore fewer needs for king-sized landing-strips.

Click Here to View Newest Entries

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